Describe your identity essay

Describe your identity essay prompt - Write an essay to describe your identity.

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Describe your identity essay example

I was born in a mixed race family to a white mother and black father. I have Swedish, German (the old country), English and Scottish background from my mother's side; African-American and American Indian from my father's side. I am now an adult. The question of identity is always important to growing up but when there are two different races it becomes even more complicated.

I grew up knowing that I had a lot of cultural differences with my peers but could never really identify how many until I started school. In kindergarten all the other students were one race, mostly white or Hispanic, so they got along well without paying attention to skin color – not me. When we did painting projects, play kitchens or any kind of project that required a different color of paint, I felt like the odd ball. I took Spanish in grade school and it was about second grade when we did art projects that required a certain color (brown) be used for specific things instead of another color (black). My teacher assigned all the kids who were white to brown and me to black. I remember looking around at everyone's eyes in the class and wondering how no one else was bothered by this, but it bothered me so much that I cried myself to sleep that night.

There were other events such as this where my skin tone made me the obvious outcast among others. Actually having siblings helped somewhat with the identity problems when they would tease each other about their skin tone or clothes or just about anything. Eventually though, people figure out what's normal for them in their life and they don't pay much attention to it.

I didn't really think about race too much until I got a little older; the age when you start paying attention to how cute the boys are or how cool your friends are. We had spent our summer camping in the mountains of Colorado where there was a variety of races all together who were very nice to each other and it was like nothing mattered except having fun, then we came back home. Because I had been teased so badly for being different while growing up, I tried extra hard to make sure that no one made me feel that way again – this included white boys who liked Asian girls (ie: me). This was a difficult time for me when I was making new friends because I felt like I couldn't trust anyone to not make fun of my race or skin tone; it took many years before I realized that I had taken that feeling with me into my adult life.

When you grow up looking more white than anything else, it is almost impossible to know what it's like to feel like an outsider but now as an adult and after much soul searching, you come to find out the things from your past affect who you are right now. One positive thing about being bi-racial is that usually there are two different cultures which can give you a very interesting outlook on life. You also have double the holidays: Halloween (white), Thanksgiving (black) – and nothing in between.

My mother tells me that when I was a child I told her that one day all children would be equal and she said to me "how could they be?" In my heart I believe it is possible but it has not happened yet so we have to keep trying until love wins over ignorance.

I am a college student now but I will always hold on to this feeling of being different because this emotion has helped shape who I am as an adult. The only difference now is that the feelings are more positive: strength, confidence, perseverance – things you use when faced with adversity.

When asked if there were any songs or movies about people like myself, those are the first things that came to mind: 2Pac's "Changes" and the movie "Miss Saigon." 2Pac says that he can't change his race, but I believe that he is trying to express that life would be a lot easier for everyone if we just accepted people of all races. He mentions things like how people look so much better when they are not angry and those who think, act or speak differently than what is socially acceptable should have rights as well. These lyrics go right along with the movie Miss Saigon which also talks about racial issues in the Vietnam War era where the main character falls in love with an American soldier.

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homeworkdoer
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answered 07/29/2021

How to describe your identity in an essay

When you have been asked to describe your identity in an essay, you describe your ethnicity, religion, culture or country of origin. You can also choose to go in-depth on any other aspect of your identity that is important to you such as your sexuality, political views, beliefs etc.

If you are asked to write an essay about yourself try to avoid simply writing a list of events from your life and instead write about the things that have defined who you are today and what lessons you feel you have learnt from them…

When discussing identity it is common practice among writers nowadays to use the term 'social class' rather than traditional terms such as work ethic, mannerisms or general upbringing. Alternatives using the word social include cultural familiarity with certain individuals, natural empathy with others and lifestyle which is the most commonly used adjective to describe someone's social class. Writers also try to avoid using outdated expressions and choose more modern alternatives such as gender preference or even political views (depending on the context of course).

When describing identity in an essay, it is important to remember that:  

  • you should focus on your own unique character traits rather than just your background
  • although writing about yourself can be a little bit narcissistic, self-deprecating humour can make it much easier for the reader to empathise with you.
  • A personal anecdote will counteract this effects and help keep readers interested.

When describing your identity in an essay you must remember that it is not necessary for you to limit yourself to just one cultural aspect. If culture is important to you, then spend some time discussing this topic in detail as well as touch upon any other parts of your identity which are relevant to your written piece. You could also choose another aspect of yourself (such as sexuality) and discuss how both aspects relate or contrast with each other… In addition, cultural differences within society can be difficult enough for some people without others adding negative comments, so it may be an idea to avoid this subject altogether and focus more on your own personal experiences. If you do choose to write about cultural differences, however, this is the time to remember that humour can lessen the potentially negative effects of offensive writing by making it easier for readers to empathise with you.

It is important not only discuss who you are but also how and why that has come about (without falling into stereotypes such as talking about joining a gang because one's father abandoned them at a young age)…

Identity is also something which evolves over time other people have called it 'a process of becoming' and that is probably the best way to describe it.

When writing about your identity, you should also remember that not everything in life will be related to your ethnicity so it is important to spend some time discussing other aspects if this is relevant to your written piece. You could also choose another aspect of yourself (such as sexuality) and discuss how both aspects relate or contrast with each other…

In addition, cultural differences within society can be difficult enough for some people without others adding negative comments, so it may be an idea to avoid this subject altogether and focus more on your own personal experiences. If you do choose to write about cultural differences, however, make sure that any offensive language or sentiments are tempered by humour.

Another personal memory which I shall use to illustrate the point is of my father's death, when I was seventeen. For some reason that day, despite being a very cold and wet October afternoon, hundreds of people turned out for his funeral. Although this was somewhat disquieting at first it soon became clear why they were there: he had been much loved as a local character and his passing affected everyone who knew him closely or even casually; everyone came from miles away just to say goodbye. It was such an emotional time but also quite humbling that so many people should remember him so fondly.

VIPService
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answered 07/29/2021
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