5-3 Project One Submission

Competency In this project, you will demonstrate your mastery of the following competency: Translate requirements to solve problems computationally Scenario You work for a small company that creates text-based games. You have been asked to pitch an idea to your team for a text-based adventure game with a theme and environment of your choice. Your game must include different rooms, items, and a villain. The basic gameplay will require the player to move between different rooms to gather all of the items. A player wins the game by collecting all the items before encountering the villain. The player will have two options for commands in the game: moving to a different room, and getting an item from the room they are in. Movement between rooms happens in four simple directions: North, South, East, and West. You must include the designs for your game as a part of your idea pitch. Specifically, you have been asked to provide a map that displays the different rooms and items. You have also been asked to use pseudocode or flowcharts to design code for moving between rooms and getting items. If your pitch gets approved, these designs will help your team members understand the pitch, and will help the team develop the game in the future. Directions In this project, you will break the problem down into a set of requirements for your game program. Then you will design your game by creating a storyboard and pseudocode or flowcharts. Remember, in Project One, you are only designing the game. You will actually develop the code for your game in Project Two. Review the Sample Dragon Text Game Storyboard in the Supporting Materials section to see a sample storyboard for a dragon-themed game. You will begin by creating a storyboard to plan out your game. Using one of the templates located in the What to Submit section, write a short paragraph that describes the theme of your game by answering all of the following questions: What is your theme? What is the basic storyline? What rooms will you have? (Note: You need a minimum of eight.) What items will you have? (Note: You need a minimum of six.) Who is your villain? Next, you will complete your storyboard by designing a map that organizes the required elements of the game (rooms, items, and villain). Using the blank map in your template, organize the different rooms and the items in each room. The following requirements must be met: There must be a minimum of eight rooms. Each room must contain one item, with the exception of the “start” room and the room containing the villain. The “start” room is where players will begin their moves and should not contain any items. The room containing the villain should not contain any items. Remember, to win the game, the player must move through the rooms, collect all the items, and avoid the room with the villain until all of the items have been collected. Make sure that it is possible for the player to win the game. For example, the room with the villain should not block a room containing an item. Note: The blank map in the template is provided as a guide. You may add more rooms or change the locations of rooms to suit your needs. This map is for your planning purposes; the player will not have access to this map in the game. You will be able to use your map later when creating and testing your code as a part of Project Two. Carefully review the Sample Dragon Text Game Walkthrough video and Sample Dragon Text Game Output reading, located in the Supporting Materials section. These will give you an understanding of how the text-based game should work. As you read, consider the following questions: What are the different steps needed in this program? How might you outline them in a way that a computer can understand? What information would you need from the player at each point (inputs)? What information would you output to the player at each point? When might it be a good idea to use “IF” and “IF ELSE” statements? When might it be a good idea to use loops? When might it be a good idea to use functions (optional)? Note: You are not required to turn in anything for this step. However, this step is important to prepare you to design your code in Steps #4 and 5. Create pseudocode or a flowchart that logically outlines the steps that will allow the player to move between rooms using commands to go North, South, East, and West. Use your notes from Step #3 to help you design this section of code. Be sure to address the following: What input do you need from the player? How will you prompt the player for that input? How will you validate the input? What should the program do if the player enters a valid direction? What output should result? What should the program do if the player enters an invalid direction? What output should result? How will you control the program flow with decision branching and loops? Create pseudocode or a flowchart that logically outlines the steps that will allow the player to get the item from the room they are in and add it to their inventory. Use your notes from Step #3 to help you design this section of code. Be sure to address the following: What input do you need from the player? How will you prompt the player for that input? How will you validate the input? What should the program do if the player enters a valid item (the item in their current room)? What output should result? What should the program do if the player enters an invalid item (an item not in their current room)? What output should result? How will you control the program flow with decision branching or loops? What to Submit To complete this project, you must submit the following: Design Document or Design Presentation Submit your completed Design Document Template or Design Presentation Template, which should contain all of the designs for your program. Be sure that you have completed the following pieces of the template: Storyboard (Theme Description and Map) Include a paragraph (if using Word) or a slide (if using PowerPoint) that describes the theme, the basic storyline, the rooms, the items, and the villain. Submit your completed map with the layout of the different rooms and the items in each room. Your map should be on one page of the Word document or one slide of the PowerPoint presentation. You completed these items in Steps #1 and 2. Pseudocode or Flowcharts Include the pseudocode or flowcharts showing how the player will move between rooms and get the item from each room. Input, output, and the decision branching and loops that control the program flow should be clear. You completed these designs in Steps #4 and 5. Supporting Materials The following resources may help support your work on the project: Reading: Sample Dragon Text Game Storyboard This storyboard document includes a sample theme description and map for a dragon-themed text-based adventure game. Use this document as a guide for writing your own storyboard. Note: This storyboard does not include any pseudocode or flowcharts. You will need to include those elements in your final design document or presentation. Video: Sample Dragon Text Game Walkthrough (8:24) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvmAaQWWMWE&feature=youtu.be This video shows a sample dragon-themed text game. There is a brief description of the game, as well as a video that shows the game running and a player moving through different rooms and gathering items based on the commands. Review this video to help you understand how a text-based adventure game works. A video transcript is available: Transcript for Sample Dragon Text Game Walkthrough. Reading: Sample Dragon Text Game Output This document shows the sample inputs and outputs for the dragon-themed text game. Review the sample inputs and outputs to better understand how a text-based adventure game works. Use this reading to help you create the pseudocode or flowcharts for the sections of code. Reading: A Mini History of Text Based Games This optional reading will give you additional context about the history of text-based games.

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1 IT 140 A Mini History of Text-Based Games Text-based games were the predecessor to the reality-based video games we play today. They were "interactive fiction" where words came to life as players read text and made decisions about what to do. These text-based games simulated environments where players used text commands to control their characters and influence the gaming environment. Imagine a current action-adventure video game where, instead of using a controller or touchscreen to give your character directions, you enter text on a command line. There are no graphics on the screen, forcing you to use your imagination. Commands you enter might be “open door”, “go west”, or “fight troll”. These commands change the way the story plays out. While it may be hard to imagine a video game without any videos, these text games were very popular in the 70s and 80s. Many programmers and computer technicians played role-playing board games, like Dungeons and Dragons, with their friends. A text-based game allowed them to take their adventures to the digital realm. They could play their games on the mainframes at work, submitting commands with a teleprinter and receiving the output on paper. T100S Teleprinter by Jens Ohlig under CC BY-SA 2.0 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:T100S_teleprinter.jpg https://www.flickr.com/people/37996627153@N01 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en 2 Eventually, monochrome monitors allowed players to see their input and output in real time, right before their eyes. Players were able to enjoy playing Lunar Lander and Star Trek using displays like the following: GT40 Lunar Lander by Brouhaha under CC BY-SA 3.0 Star Trek Text Game by James Gibbon under CC BY-SA 3.0 You can still find playable versions of these games online, such as Lunar Lander, Star Trek, and Zork. They will help you see how far game development has come. (Note: Links may change over time. Search for the game name and “simulator”.) In this class, you will have the opportunity to create your own version of a text-based game. You will be able to see your code come to life as it becomes interactive. Through the use of conditionals and loops, you will be able to guide adventurers through your world in the same way these early text-based games did several decades ago. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GT40_Lunar_Lander.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Brouhaha https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Star_Trek_text_game.png https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jamesgibbon https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en http://www.lunarmissionsimulator.com/ http://mtrek.com/play-now/ http://www.web-adventures.org/cgi-bin/webfrotz?s=ZorkDungeon 3 References McIntosh, J. (2018, July 20). A brief history of text-based games and open source. Opensource.com. https://opensource.com/article/18/7/interactive-fiction-tools Rileym65 (GitHub username). (n.d.). Lunar mission simulator. Lunar Mission Simulator. https://www.lunarmissionsimulator.com/index.html Star Trek text game (Video game). (n.d.). TV Tropes. https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/StarTrekTextGame IT 140 A Mini History of Text-Based Games

1 IT 140 Sample Dragon Text Game Output Overview In Projects One and Two, you will be designing and then developing a text-based game with a theme of your choice. This handout shows input and output from the sample Dragon Text Game. This will help give you an understanding of how a text-based game works. In this dragon-themed game, the player is trying to find all the items (book, armor, helmet, sword, shield, and peanut butter sandwich) before running into the villain (the dragon). You can also see a sample execution of this game in the Sample Dragon Text Game Walkthrough, which is located in the Supporting Materials sections of the projects. Sample Output Below is sample output of the program, with the player’s input shown in bold font. You will see examples of the game’s output in response to different commands such as moving between rooms or getting items. You will also see examples of input validation, or how the game responds to invalid commands such as getting an item that is not in the current room, moving in a direction that is not valid, or entering a command in the wrong format. As a reminder, the output here is just a sample. The output for your game does not have to exactly match what is here. Dragon Text Adventure Game Collect 6 items to win the game, or be eaten by the dragon. Move commands: go South, go North, go East, go West Add to Inventory: get 'item name' You are in the Great Hall Inventory : [] --------------------------- Enter your move: go North You are in the Dungeon Inventory : [] You see a Sword --------------------------- Enter your move: get Sword Sword retrieved! You are in the Dungeon Inventory : ['Sword'] --------------------------- Enter your move: get Shield Can’t get Shield! You are in the Dungeon Inventory : ['Sword'] --------------------------- Enter your move: 2 go South You are in the Great Hall Inventory : ['Sword'] --------------------------- Enter your move: go East You are in the Kitchen Inventory : ['Sword'] You see a Sandwich --------------------------- Enter your move: Sandwich Invalid Input! You are in the Kitchen Inventory : ['Sword'] You see a Sandwich --------------------------- Enter your move: get Sandwich Sandwich retrieved! You are in the Kitchen Inventory : ['Sword', 'Sandwich'] --------------------------- Enter your move: go South You can’t go that way! You are in the Kitchen Inventory : ['Sword', 'Sandwich'] --------------------------- Enter your move: go North You are in the Dining Room Inventory : ['Sword', 'Sandwich'] You see a Dragon NOM NOM…GAME OVER! Thanks for playing the game. Hope you enjoyed it. IT 140 Sample Dragon Text Game Output Overview Sample Output

1 IT 140 Sample Dragon Text Game Storyboard The dragon has taken over the dining room and your party guests will arrive in a matter of hours. You need to defeat the dragon before your guests arrive, but before you fight the dragon you will need a few items. You will need a book from the library to learn how to defeat the dragon, armor from the bedroom to protect your body, a helmet from the cellar to protect your head, a sword from the dungeon to stab the dragon, a shield from the gallery to protect yourself from the dragon’s fire, and finally a peanut butter sandwich from the kitchen to gather enough energy to defeat the dragon. Here is a map of the castle rooms and items to help navigate your quest: Gallery Item: Shield Dungeon Item: Sword Dining Room Dragon! Kitchen Item: Sword Cellar Item: Helmet Library Item: Book Bedroom Item: Armor Great Hall North North North South South South East East East East West West West West IT 140 Sample Dragon Text Game Storyboard

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