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1 HMKN 101 – Biomechanics SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND EXERCISE SCIENCES Winter Term 2, January to April 2020 Instructor Information: Class Information: Teaching Assistant Information: Gordon Binsted Days: Tuesday and Thursday • TBD Office: ART 360 Time: 11:00 – 12:30pm Phone: 7-9642 Location: FIP 204 • TBD Email: gordon.binsted@ubc.ca Office Hours: by appointment Academic Calendar Entry: Application of the elementary principles of physics and math to quantitative analysis of human movement. Analysis will also focus on the development of forces within muscles and their effect on initiating and controlling human movement (pertaining to exercise, physical activity, and rehabilitation). [3-0-0] Prerequisite: Registration limited to students in the B.H.K. program. Course Description: The goal of this course is for students to gain an understanding of how the basic principles of physics may be combined with knowledge of the musculoskeletal system to form a basis for studying human movement. Examples of movement will include those pertaining to exercise and more general activities such as climbing stairs. The motion of objects in sports (e.g., a baseball) will also be investigated. The student should gain an understanding of the use of a quantitative analysis to explain how mechanical principles govern human motion. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course, students will be able to… • Understand how two-dimensional rigid-body dynamics can be used to quantify human motion • Grasp the cause-and-effect relationship between forces applied to an object and the resultant linear or angular motion of the object • Perform mathematical analyses of complex human motion in two dimensions Textbook: McGinnis, Peter M., Biomechanics of Sport and Exercise. Human Kinetics Publishers • 2nd (2004) or 3rd (2013) edition will be fine Lecture Materials: Classes are structured to permit extensive practice solving the types of problems which will appear on assignments and exams. As such, a scientific calculator is required for all lectures. Although entirely optional, students may find it helpful to bring a small ruler, a protractor and graphing (a.k.a. grid or engineering) paper to assist in sketching problems accurately. Evaluation: Assignments (due at the start of lecture on January 21, February 6, March 5 and March 26) 20% Midterm Exam 1 (February 11) 20% Midterm Exam 2 (March 17) 20% Final Exam (sometime between April 14-29) 40% 2 Assignments: 4 assignments will be given during the term. Assignments will be posted to the course website on Canvas and a hard copy of the assignment will be due at the beginning of the lecture 1 week later (i.e., before 11:05:00am). As of September 2013, the School of Health and Exercise Sciences has a standardized policy for late assignments. Any assignment received after the appointed time will be considered late and assessed the following penalties: <24 hours: 20% deducted from grade 24–48 hours: 50% deducted from grade >48 hours: a grade of zero Midterm and Final Exams: All exams will be a combination of multiple-choice, short answer and calculation questions. Midterm exams will be held during class time. When a midterm exam is missed, the student is required to submit documentation to the instructor which provides a valid reason for the absence. In the event of a medical reason, the School’s Student Medical Absence Form must be completed. Without acceptable documentation, the student will receive a grade of zero. If acceptable documentation is provided, the weighting of the midterm exam (20%) will be transferred to the final exam; i.e., the final exam will be worth 60%. A known absence (e.g., a varsity sporting event) must be brought to the attention of the instructor as soon as the student is aware of the conflict. The final exam is cumulative. It will take place during the exam period and, except for cases of an examination hardship / clash or academic concession, must be written at the scheduled time. Hence, wait until you know your exam schedule before booking any travel. All electronic communication devices are strictly prohibited during exams so a cell phone may not be used as a substitute for a calculator. If a programmable calculator (e.g., TI-84 Plus) is brought to an exam, the student will be required to reset the memory in the presence of the instructor or teaching assistant. It is the responsibility of the student to know how to perform this task. If the student cannot reset the memory of a programmable calculator, the calculator will be confiscated for the duration of the exam. For all exams, students will be required to sign in and show their student card or a piece of government-issued photo ID. Course Policies: Please refer to the University, Faculty and School webpages for full details of the academic policies applicable to this course. It is the student’s responsibility to be familiar with all policies. Some of my policies specific to this course include… 1. Questions / Communication • If you do not understand a topic, concept, calculation, etc., I strongly encourage you to ask questions at the time it is presented during a lecture • I am happy to receive and answer brief or straightforward questions via email • If a question requires a lengthy answer or explanation, I will not provide the answer in an email – you will be required to make an appointment to visit me in my office • I will not answer questions within 24 hours of an exam – stay on top of the material and ask questions as the course progresses 2. Lecture notes • Complete lecture slides will not be provided • A detailed outline of the topics/learning objectives of each lecture will be posted to Canvas • If you miss a lecture, it is your responsibility to obtain the lecture notes of a classmate 3. Phones and computers • Phones must be put away and muted • Computers may only be used for course purposes during class time • Students misusing electronics during class time will be asked to leave 3 4. Grades • The teaching assistants do the marking for the course. If you have a question/concern about the grade on an assignment or exam, your first step is to make an appointment with the teaching assistant who marked your work. If the matter cannot be resolved with the TA, email me to make an appointment • You have 1 week from the date that assignments are returned (or exam grades are posted) to initiate the process of appealing your grade • The final grade of every student will reflect their actual performance during the term • That is, there will be no rounding of grades (e.g. from 49% to 50% or 79% to 80%) • To hand out extra marks here and there or offer additional assignments to select students would be unfair to your classmates and, in the grand scheme of things, would undermine the degree that you are all working toward Academic Honesty: As stated on the UBC Okanagan website, “It is the student's obligation to inform himself or herself of the applicable standards for academic honesty.” Detailed information on academic misconduct can be found within the Student Conduct and Discipline section of the UBC Okanagan Academic Calendar. http://www.calendar.ubc.ca/okanagan/index.cfm?tree=3,54,0,0 Equity, Human Rights, Discrimination and Harassment: UBC Okanagan is a place where every student, staff and faculty member should be able to study and work in an environment that is free from human rights-based discrimination and harassment. Under UBC’s Policy 3 on Discrimination and Harassment, UBC prohibits discrimination and harassment on the basis of the following grounds: age, ancestry, colour, family status, marital status, physical or mental disability, place of origin, political belief, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation or unrelated criminal conviction. If you require assistance related to an issue of equity, discrimination or harassment, please contact the Equity and Inclusion Office. Equity and Inclusion Office UNC 216 250-807-9291 equity.ubco@ubc.ca Academic Accommodation for Students with Disabilities The University of British Columbia recognizes its moral and legal duty to provide academic accommodation. The University must remove barriers and provide opportunities to students with a disability, enabling them to access University services, programs, and facilities, and to be welcomed as participating members of the University community. The University's goal is to ensure fair and consistent treatment of all students, including students with a disability, in accordance with their distinct needs and in a manner consistent with academic principles. The University will provide academic accommodation to students with disabilities in accordance with the British Columbia Human Rights Code R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 210 and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Part I of the Constitution Act, 1982, being Schedule B to the Canada Act 1982 (U.K.), 1982, c. 11. Provision of academic accommodation shall not lower the academic standards of the University. Academic accommodation shall not remove the need for evaluation and the need to meet essential learning outcomes. Students with a disability who wish to have an academic accommodation should contact the Disability Resource Centre without delay (see UBC Policy 73: Academic Accommodation for Students with Disabilities). Disability Resource Center UNC 214 250-807-8053 drc.questions@ubc.ca 4 Tentative Course Progression: Date Topic Textbook Reading Tuesday, January 7 Course syllabus; math review Introduction Thursday, January 9 Forces Chapter 1 Tuesday, January 14 Forces; assignment 1 posted Chapter 1 Thursday, January 16 Forces and Linear kinematics Chapters 1 & 2 Tuesday, January 21 Linear kinematics; assignment 1 due Chapter 2 Thursday, January 23 Linear kinematics Chapter 2 Tuesday, January 28 Linear kinetics Chapter 3 Thursday, January 31 Linear kinetics; assignment 2 posted Chapter 3 Tuesday, February 4 Linear kinetics Chapter 3 Thursday, February 6 Review for midterm exam; assignment 2 due Tuesday, February 11 Midterm exam 1 Thursday, February 13 Work, power and energy Chapter 4 Tuesday, February 18 Reading Week – no class Thursday, February 20 Reading Week – no class Tuesday, February 25 Work, power and energy Chapter 4 Thursday, February 27 Torques and moments of force; assignment 3 posted Chapter 5 Tuesday, March 3 Torques and moments of force Chapter 5 Thursday, March 5 Angular kinematics; assignment 3 due Chapter 6 Tuesday, March 10 Angular kinematics Chapter 6 Thursday, March 12 Review for midterm exam Tuesday, March 17 Midterm exam 2 Thursday, March 19 Angular kinetics; assignment 4 posted Chapter 7 Tuesday, March 24 Angular kinetics Chapter 7 Thursday, March 26 Biomechanics in physiotherapy; assignment 4 due Tuesday, March 31 Mechanics of biological materials Chapter 9 Thursday, April 2 Neuromuscular system Chapters 11 & 12 Tuesday, April 7 Review for final exam

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