Informative Speech Guideline and Worksheet

REQUIREMENTS

1. Formal Outline: You will be required to turn in a full-sentence outline complete with in-text citations and a works cited page on the day of your speech.

2. Sources: Minimum of 3 (three) orally cited sources from at least 2 types of research with 1 being a journal article from CPP library portal. This means that if you cite all web sites, you do not meet the assignment requirements. For example: 1 newspaper article, 1 peer reviewed or industry specific journal article, and 1 pamphlet OR 1 government (.gov) or university (.edu) web site article, 1.book.

a. Sources must be heard during the speech

b. Cited in the text of the outline (called in-text citation)

c. Work Cited page

· You may use either citation MLA or APA format (do not mix the two formats)

INFORMATIVE SPEECH WORKSHEET

This worksheet is meant to be a simple guide to helping you prepare your presentation (written) outline for your speech. Keep in mind, the contents will differ from student to student, depending on your topic/organizational pattern but the “parts” or the sections should be very similar. I expect ALL parts to be included in your final outline, typed out and checked for grammar/spelling/punctuation.

Informative speeches are meant to present NEW information to your audience. So, you may think of yourself as “teacher for a day.” You may select any Cal Poly Pomona service, activity, or club that benefits students: LRC, confidential survivor advocate, sorority, health center, psychology services, career center, a club that you are in or are considering joining. Informative speech topics are on a first come, first serve basis. Claim yours as soon as you can.

Organizational Patterns: You may choose one of these different types of organizational patterns to present your information. Please use the one that will allow your information to “flow” best.

1. Chronological: Follows the natural sequential order. In other words, you follow something according to “time/time-order/sequence.”

The life of Elvis Presley:

Main Points: Birth/Early Life, Career, Death

2. Spatial: Follows the physical arrangement of a place, scene, object in which main points can be arranged in physical proximity/space.

Wonders of the World:

Main Points: Pyramids of Mexico, Coliseum of Rome, Great Wall of China

3. Topical (also called categorical): Follows a topic based speech, in which each of the main points acts as its own “mini-topic/subtopic.”

Types of Common Cancers:

Main Points: Breast, Lung, Bone.

Name. OUTLINE

Title: Cal poly Pomona game room

General Purpose: To Inform

Specific Purpose: This statement should include what specifically you plan to inform audience about.

Organizational Pattern:

INTRODUCTION (All capital letters)

I. Attention Getter: This represents the first words out of your mouth! So make sure it GRABS the audience in. Make sure it is relevant/appropriate to your topic. Some devices you can use for the attention getter are:

· Joke/Humor (Make sure it is appropriate/in good taste!)

· Narrative/Story (Be brief)

· Shocking Statement

· Fact/Statistic

· Poem

· Quote

· Question

· Visual Aid/Activity

II. Specific Purpose Statement: Today, I will inform you…

III. Significance/ Relevance to the audience: This statement should let the audience know why it is relevant and/or important to them.

IV. Credibility: If you have a particular credibility with a topic (i.e. if you are a member, work at, or have used the services) then reveal this and your research on the topic in a credibility statement. This will help create trust between you and your audience and demonstrate that you know what you are discussing.

V. Preview Statement: This statement should reveal ALL of your main points in one simple sentence and give the audience a clear picture of what is to come in your speech. Another option is to use three sentences with parallel words (i.e. first, second, third) to be simple and concise and allow the audience to hear how many points they will hear within your speech.

MAJOR TRANSITION: This statement allows the audience to hear that you are moving from the introduction to the body and can be relatively brief. â€œNow that we know what we are going to discuss, let us first look at….”

BODY (All capital letters)

I. Main Point: Provide a general opening sentence which previews information and evidence to come in the sub-points below. (*Note: Keep sub-points in pairs at minimum).

A. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support. (*Note: keep sentences simple and make sure the information is in clear “groupings”).

B. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support.

i. Related to the first sub-point, but again, provides even more detailed information/evidence.

C. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support.

i. Related to the first sub-point, but again, provides even more detailed information/evidence.

Minor Transition: This sentence shows movement from point A to point B.

II. Main Point: Provide a general opening sentence which previews information and evidence to come in the sub-points below. (*Note: Keep sub-points in pairs at minimum).

A. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support. (*Note: keep sentences simple and make sure the information is in clear “groupings”).

B. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support.

i. Related to the first sub-point, but again, provides even more detailed information/evidence.

C. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support.

i. Related to the first sub-point, but again, provides even more detailed information/evidence.

Minor Transition: This sentence shows movement from point B to point C.

III. Main Point: Provide a general opening sentence which previews information and evidence to come in the sub-points below. (*Note: Keep sub-points in pairs at minimum).

A. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support. (*Note: keep sentences simple and make sure the information is in clear “groupings”).

B. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support.

i. Related to the first sub-point, but again, provides even more detailed information/evidence.

C. Sub-point: Related to the main point, but provides more specific information and may include evidence to support.

i. Related to the first sub-point, but again, provides even more detailed information/evidence.

MAJOR TRANSITION: This sentence should move the audience from your body into your conclusion.

CONCLUSION (All capital letters)

I. Review Statement: This statement should reiterate your points again to summarize what your audience learned about in your speech. Make sure to include all of your main points. This should be the mirror image of your preview statement but written/spoken in past tense, “Today we have learned about…”

II. Final Thought: This sentence(s) leave your audience with a great last impression of you and your speech/information. Like the attention getter, you can use devices such as a quote, question, story, joke, etc. to create a lasting memory. Better yet! Tie it to your attention getter.

WORKS CITED

Your works cited should represent ONLY the information/evidence you use within your speech as opposed to all of the information you researched. Make sure to put citations in MLA or APA format and list in alphabetical order according to last name of the authors.

CITING YOUR SOURCES

We all know plagiarism is wrong, but according to www.plagarism.org/problem4.html, 36% of college students “cut and paste” from the internet without even citing where it came from! Another 41% copy from printed books, journals and other articles without giving proper credit.

WHAT/WHEN do I Cite?

You MUST cite in the following scenarios:

1. When you use a direct quote (word-for-word)

2. When you paraphrase (summarize in your own words/ideas)

3. When you use statistics, illustrations, diagrams, graphs etc.

You DO NOT need to cite when information is common knowledge

(Sacramento is the capitol of the state of California). However, when in doubt, CITE!!!

Paraphrasing Techniques: Change the sentence to include words that reflect your own voice. Often times, we hear very technical quotes which sound “different” from the overall tone and vocabulary of the speech. Paraphrasing is helpful to synthesize your information and make sure it sounds like one big body of work rather than sounding “choppy.”

1. “In Romero’s words…”

2. “Romero expressed…”

3. “Romero stated…”

Quote from Estrella Romero: â€œIt is my opinion that Communication Studies is the best major a college can offer! It is useful toward any career whether it be health care to business. I think that all students should consider either majoring or even minoring in Communication Studies!”

Paraphrase: In Romero’s words, having a degree in Communication Studies may help in any career field you choose to enter. She believes that students should look into possibly majoring or minoring in Communication Studies.

WHY do I need to Cite?

1. It looks good! It shows you did your “research.”

2. It shows courtesy and respect to the authors who worked hard to publish their work!

3. It is ethical!

HOW do I Cite?

Simple citing involves a three step process:

1. Preview the information (Begin with a opening statement)

2. Cite the information (Plug in the “According to…” followed by the information).

3. Explain the information (If the information is unclear, provide a brief explanation)

General Citations

· You do NOT need to include the words “quote” “unquote” when citing evidence in your speech.

· Make sure to include citations in all Power Point and/or Visual Aids.

· Remember, you must include enough information about the source so that your audience member can easily find that same information, if he/she would like to research more of your topic on their own.

· Try to avoid the same phrase, “According to…” Rather, play with the verbiage. Some other examples you can use are:

· Romero stated…

· Romero asserted…

· Romero suggested…

· As stated in…

· As found in…

· As reported in…

· Evidence in_____ points out that…

· It was reported in…

Facts/Statistics

Fact and Statistics can be very powerful and useful evidence. However, keep in mind that they can quickly become confusing. Some tips for using facts/statistics:

1. Make sure they are both accurate and current!

2. Be mindful of using too many, an audience does not like to hear too many numbers.

3. Be sure to round off numbers if you can (while maintaining the integrity of the information) to help audience comprehend.

4. Try to summarize the statistical information if it is very complex.

Websites

Information on websites can be useful. However, there are several websites that are not scholarly, contain unverifiable information and do not even provide pertinent information such as the authors and updated information. Likewise, although the internet is often the first place students will go to for research, keep in mind that students presented well researched speeches long before the invention of the internet, so as you begin the research process, ask, “If the internet did not exist, where would I go for research??” For those sources you find on the internet, ask yourself, who created the site? Why did they create this site and what information is on it?

Include authors, organizations and dates. When citing in the actual speech, you do not need to site the entire complicated web URL. For example, instead of saying, www.centerfordiseasecontrol.1234/html. You can simply say, “The Center for Disease Control’s Website…”

Television Show/Films

Some students may choose to use television/films for their evidence. If you include this in your research make sure to site the name of the TV show/film, title, air date and/or year.

Personal Interviews

Personal Interviews represent a form of primary research in which you are the person conducting the research. If you include personal interviews as evidence, make sure to include the name of the interviewee, their title/position, and date of interview.

Magazine/Newspaper/Academic Journal (Periodicals)

These represent some of the most common forms of evidence. Be sure to include, the author(s), date of publication, title of article and name of magazine/newspaper/journal. Here is the link to purchase college research papers

Many thanks to Dr. Star Romero of Riverside City College for allowing me the use of her excellent speech packet.

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