RE: LEVEL 3 - UNIT 5 SAFEGUARDING

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SAFEGUARDING ASSIGNMENT ‘Safeguarding people who use services from suffering any form of abuse or improper treatment while receiving care and treatment’ Unit 5: Safeguarding and Protection in Care Settings Please answer the following questions, please refer to Heritage Care’s policy on safeguarding and also relevant legislative requirements in addition to the 6 c’s in care. Safeguarding Adults Principles Safeguarding adults is about reducing or, ideally, preventing the risk of significant harm from abuse and exploitation, and simultaneously supporting people to take control of their own lives by making informed choices. We all have a part to play in securing this for the adults in our care, particularly for those who are especially vulnerable. The UK Government has set out 6 principles of safeguarding in health and social care that help us to understand how we can act to protect people. Agencies can use the following principles to measure existing adult safeguarding arrangements and to measure future improvements. The Principles are not in order of priority; they are all equal importance. However, we have reordered them in this document to highlight the importance of prevention and proportionate responses. Prevention of harm is always better than investigating harm that individuals have experienced, after the event. Empowerment and proportionality critical in ensuring that individuals have the best experience possible when they are involved in safeguarding enquiries. Empowerment – people should be supported to make their own decisions based on the best possible information Prevention – it is better to act before harm occurs Proportionality – what we do should be proportionate to the risk: we don’t want to be over-protective if the risk is low, as this in itself can disadvantage people and deprive of them of the opportunity to make their own decisions Protection – those in greatest need require our support and protection Partnership – safeguarding is about different people, professions, groups and communities working together to cover all the angles in preventing, detecting and reporting neglect and abuse Accountability – as in all our activities as health care assistants, we need to be accountable for what we do in safeguarding. Individuals’ Experience of Effective Adult Safeguarding Empowerment – I am asked what I want as the outcomes from the safeguarding process and these directly inform what happens. Prevention - I receive clear and simple information about what abuse is, how to recognise the signs and what I can do to seek help. Proportionality - I am sure that the professionals will work for my best interests, as I see them and will only get involved as much as needed. Protection - I get help and support to report abuse. I get help to take part in the safeguarding process to the extent to which I want and to which I am able. Partnership – I know that staff treat any personal and sensitive information in confidence, only sharing what is helpful and necessary. I am confident that professionals will work together to get the best result for me. Accountability – I understand the role of everyone involved in my life. Organisations’ Experience of Effective Adult Safeguarding Empowerment - We give individuals the right information about how to recognise abuse and what they can do to keep themselves safe. We give them clear and simple information about how to report abuse and crime and what support we can give. We consult them before we take any action. Where someone lacks capacity to make a decision, we always act in his or her best interests. Protection - We have effective ways of assessing and managing risk. Our local complaints and reporting arrangements for abuse and suspected criminal offences work well. Local people understand how we work and how to contact us. We take responsibility for putting them in touch with the right person. Prevention - We help the community to identify and report signs of abuse and suspected criminal offences. We train staff how to recognise signs and take action to prevent abuse occurring. In all our work, we consider how to make communities safer. Proportionality - We discuss with the individual and where appropriate, with partner agencies what to do where there is risk of significant harm before we take a decision. Risk is an element of many situations and should be part of any wider assessment. Partnership - We are good at sharing information locally. We have multi-agency partnership arrangements in place and staff understand how to use these. We foster a “one” team approach that places the welfare of individuals before the “needs” of the system. Accountability - The roles of all agencies are clear, together with the lines of accountability. Staff understand what is expected of them and others. Agencies recognise their responsibilities to each other, act upon them and accept collective responsibility for safeguarding arrangements. Please look carry out some self-guided study into: · Mental Capacity Act 2005 · No Secrets · Care Act 2014 · Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 · Equality Act 2010 · Human Rights Act 1998 · CQC Regulation 13: https://www.cqc.org.uk/guidance-providers/regulations-enforcement/regulation-13-safeguarding-service-users-abuse-improper 1.1 Explain the term safeguarding Guidance: Protecting people's health, wellbeing and human and individual rights, and enabling them to live free from harm, abuse and neglect. 1.2 Explain own role and responsibilities in safeguarding individual Guidance: ● Training. ● Knowledge of policies and procedures relevant to own level of responsibility. ● Awareness of own practice. Define the following terms: 1.3 Definition: 2.1 What are the signs & symptoms? Physical abuse Domestic abuse Sexual abuse Emotional/psychological abuse Financial/material abuse Modern slavery Discriminatory abuse Institutional/organisational abuse Self-neglect Neglect by others 1.4 Describe harm Guidance: ● Physical or emotional injury that is deliberately inflicted. 1.5 Describe restrictive practices Guidance: ● Use of physical restraint. ● Use of medication as a restraint. ● Use of seclusion. 2.2 Describe factors that may contribute to an individual being more vulnerable to abuse Guidance: ● Factors may include: o a setting or situation o the individual. ● The individual’s age, e.g. the elderly. ● Physical ability, e.g. frail, immature development, physical disability or sensory impairment. ● Cognitive ability, e.g. maturity, level of education and intellectual understanding, learning difficulties. ● Emotional resilience, e.g. mental health difficulties; depression; stress, e.g. impact of stressful life events, including bereavement, divorce, illness or injury. ● Culture or religion, e.g. because of prejudice or discrimination, refugees and asylum seekers. ● Socio-economic factors, e.g. financial situation. 3.1 Explain the actions to take if there are suspicions that an individual is being abused Guidance: ● Importance of following relevant legislative requirements, policies, procedures and agreed ways of working. ● Find out basic information, including who the alleged victim is, who the alleged abuser is and the categories of abuse that could be happening. ● Report suspicions and allegations to an appropriate/named person. ● Importance of treating all allegations and suspicions seriously. ● Have knowledge of lines of communication and reporting. 3.2 Explain the actions to take if an individual alleges that they are being abused Guidance: ● Boundaries of own role and responsibilities. ● Report suspicions and allegations to appropriate/named person. ● Importance of clear verbal and accurate written reports. ● Importance of not asking leading questions with individuals concerned. ● Importance of respectful listening. ● Confidentiality and agreed procedures for sharing information on disclosure. ● Importance of actual evidence and avoiding hearsay. 3.3 Identify ways to ensure that evidence of abuse is preserved Guidance: ● Use of written reports, including details of alleged/suspected abuse, signed, dated and witnessed. ● Agreed procedures for using electronic records. ● Confidential systems for manual records. ● Importance of timescales to ensure reliability and validity of evidence. ● Secure storage of evidence. 4.1 Identify relevant legislation, national policies and local systems that relate to safeguarding and protection from abuse Guidance: ● Relevant and up-to-date government policies. ● Care Act 2014. ● Statement of government policy on adult safeguarding (Department of Health 2011). ● Local systems, the scope of responsibility of Local Safeguarding Adults Boards (LSABs) and protection committees. ● Employer/organisational policies and procedures. ● Multi-agency adult protection arrangements for a locality. ● Mental Capacity Act 2005. 4.2 Explain the roles of different agencies in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse Local authority: Health Services: CQC: The Police: Disclosure & Barring Service Guidance: ● Importance of multi-agency and inter-agency working. ● Responsibilities for allocating a named person usually from statutory agencies in health or social care. ● Responsibilities for overseeing the safeguarding assessment and its outcome. ● The national Vetting and Barring Scheme (VBS). USEFUL LINK: https://www.scie.org.uk/care-act-2014/safeguarding-adults/ 4.3 Identify factors that have featured in reports into serious cases of abuse and neglect Guidance: ● Poor or a lack of communication between services, including not sharing important information. ● Ineffective partnership working between services. ● Lack of involvement of individuals receiving care, or their families and friends, in decisions made about their care. ● A failure to identify signs of abuse. ● Lack of management support or presence. ● Limited learning and development opportunities for workers. ● Poor staff recruitment processes. 4.4 Identify sources of information and advice about own role in safeguarding and protecting individuals from abuse, including whistleblowing Guidance: ● Policies, procedures and agreed ways of working within the workplace setting. ● Current and relevant sources of information from websites, leaflets, organisations, and local and voluntary groups. ● Government departments. ● Voluntary organisations. ● Publications; information from the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA). ● Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). ● Professional bodies/trade unions, e.g. Royal College of Nursing. ● Care Quality Commission (CQC). ● Whistleblowing policy and procedure – a whistle-blower is a person who exposes any kind of information or activity that is deemed illegal, unethical or not correct. 4.5 Identify when to seek support in situations beyond your experience and expertise ● Recognising when support is needed. ● Recognising the boundaries of own role. ● Awareness of own expertise in dealing with situations. ● Local policies and procedures. Seeking support ● Line manager. ● Senior carer. ● Care Quality Commission (CQC). ● Professional body/trade union. ● Local policy and procedure for seeking support. 5.1 Explain how the likelihood of abuse may be reduced by: ● working with person-centred values ● encouraging active participation ● promoting choice and rights ● supporting individuals with awareness of personal safety Guidance: ● Person-centred values include: o individuality o rights o choice o privacy o independence o dignity o respect o partnership o care o compassion o courage o communication o competence. Working with person-centred values ● Decrease the likelihood of abuse by working in a person-centred way. ● Implement the key values of privacy, dignity, independence, choice, rights and fulfilment. ● Decrease vulnerability by increasing confidence. ● Promote empowerment, independence and autonomy. ● Involve individuals in making their own decisions and choices. ● Respectful communication. ● Active listening. ● Main principles that all individuals have the right to live their lives free from violence, fear and abuse; the right to be protected from harm and exploitation; the right to independence; and the right to justice. Encouraging active participation ● Decrease the likelihood of abuse by encouraging active participation. ● Decrease vulnerability by improving self-confidence and self-esteem. ● Encourage involvement and self-awareness. ● Active participation is a way of working that recognises an individual’s right to participate in the activities and relationships of everyday life as independently as possible; the individual is regarded as an active partner in their own care or support, rather than a passive recipient. Promoting choices and rights ● Decrease the likelihood of abuse through promoting individual choices and decision making. ● Decrease vulnerability by promoting empowerment and independence. ● Importance of informed consent. ● Wellbeing may include aspects that are: o social o emotional o cultural o spiritual o intellectual o economic o physical o mental. Awareness of personal safety ● Engage in care decisions. ● Risk enablement. ● Person-centred care. 5.2 Explain the importance of an accessible complaints procedure for reducing the likelihood of abuse Guidance: ● To ensure an accessible complaints procedure for reducing the likelihood of abuse. ● Transparent policies, procedures and agreed ways of working. ● Importance of accountability. ● Clear systems for reporting and recording complaints. ● Robust procedures for following up on any complaints. ● Legal requirement to have a complaints procedure in place. ● Ways of ensuring the procedure is accessible (by published policy, high visibility, widespread distribution). 5.3 Outline how the likelihood of abuse can be reduced by managing risk and focusing on prevention Guidance: ● Local policies and procedures. ● Types of risk assessment, e.g. slips, trips and falls. ● Sensible and proportionate measures. ● Common risks to individuals. ● Individual risks. 6.1 Describe unsafe practices that may affect the wellbeing of individuals Guidance: ● Neglect in duty of personal care in relation to inappropriate feeding, washing, bathing, dressing, toileting. ● Inappropriate physical contact in relation to moving and handling. ● Unsafe administration of medication. ● Unreliable systems for dealing with individuals’ money or personal property. ● Failure to maintain professional boundaries. ● Failure to ensure supervision. ● Inappropriate communication or sharing of information. ● Failure to update knowledge on safeguarding issues. ● Unsafe recruitment practices may include: o poor working practices o resource difficulties o operational difficulties. 6.2 Explain the actions to take if unsafe practices have been identified Guidance: ● Report unsafe practices that have been identified. ● Report concerns to a manager or supervisor immediately, verbally and in writing. ● Use policies on whistleblowing. 6.3 Describe the actions to take if suspected abuse or unsafe practices have been reported but nothing has been done in response Guidance: ● Report concerns directly to social services, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) or the police. ● Anyone can report a suspicion or allegation of abuse. ● Workers can be disciplined, suspended or dismissed for not reporting abuse or not following the correct procedures. ● Importance of raising genuine concerns and acting on them. ● Reassurance of protection from possible reprisals and victimisation following reporting. 7.1 Describe the potential risks presented by: ● the use of electronic communication devices ● the use of the internet ● the use of social networking sites ● carrying out financial transactions online Guidance: ● Bullying and harassment. ● Fraudulent financial transactions. ● Cyber stalking. ● Data protection breach. ● Inappropriate content. ● Blackmail. ● Commercial exploitation. 7.2 Explain ways of reducing the risks presented by each of these types of activity Guidance: ● Password protection. ● Prohibit use of personal mobile phones in the workplace. ● Firewall protection. ● Personal details kept private. 7.3 Explain the importance of balancing measures for online safety against the benefits to individuals of using electronic systems and devices Guidance: ● Policies and procedures. ● Data protection and information sharing. ● ‘Safe’ sites. ● Awareness and training. Working towards the Situation Judgement Test Situation Judgement Test A Edie lives on her own and is a wheelchair users. She lives on her pension and the pension of her late husband Tom. She has a grown up son who lives in Germany. Everyday, Edie is visited by her carer – Alice. Recently, Alice has noticed a change in Edie’s personality. Edie seems withdrawn and worried, and she is not looking after herself as well as she previously was. Also, Edie’s house has been very cold; she told Alice that the boiler had broken but she had no money to fix. Alice has noticed a number of unpaid bills and unopened letters from the bank on Edie’s dining table. Alice is worried that Edie is in financial difficulty. What should Alice do? A. Talk to Edie and to help her make a plan to pay back the money she owes. B. Report the situation to her supervisor who will decide what to do. C. Tell Edie’s son she think his mother is having financial difficulties. D. Phone the banks to find out what has happened to Edie’s money. Discuss the suitable answer with your assessor and why you think this. Situation Judgement Test B Ana is a supervisor at a nursing home for individuals with long-term conditions. She has assigned Sara, a new member of the team, to care for Gordon. Gordon needs help with all aspects of personal care. On Sara’s first day she is preparing to help Gordon have a shower when she realises that he can’t access the shower without a hoist. Sara finds Ana and tells her that, although she is not trained to use the hoist, she has seen others use it and is happy to have a go on her own. What action should Ana take? A. Stop Sara from using the hoist until she has observed her colleagues using it several times. B. Replace Sara with a more experienced care worker and organise moving and handling training for Sara. C. Allow Sara to use the hoist but make sure she is always with a more experienced care worker. D. Try to find out why Sara was not trained in using the hoist while she was at her previous workplace. Discuss the suitable answer with your assessor and why you think this. Work towards End Point Assessment – Work based evidence is not required for this criterion Prepare with your assessor to have a professional discussion to cover the following criterion: D18: What abuse is and what to do when they have concerns someone is being abused D19: The national and local strategies for safeguarding and protection from abuse D20: What to do when receiving comments and complaints D21: How to recognise unsafe practice in the workplace D22: The importance and process of whistleblowing D23: How to address any dilemmas they may face between a person’s rights and their safety In your discussion you should give examples of the following, this information is taken from page 87-89 of the EPA specification. · Support others, to recognise and respond to potential signs of abuse according to agreed ways of working. · Work in partnership with external agencies to respond to concerns of abuse · Recognise, report, respond to and record unsafe practices and encourage other to do so · Lead and support other to address conflict or dilemmas that may arise between an individual’s rights and duty of care · Lead and mentor other where appropriate to promote the wellbeing of the individuals they support · Promote healthy eating and wellbeing by supporting individuals to have access to fluids, food and nutrition · Manage, monitor, report and respond to changes in the health and wellbeing of the individuals they support To achieve a pass the apprentice should: Apprentice can demonstrate that they can work independently and as part of a team to recognise and take actions to respond to signs of abuse and unsafe practices in line with their organisational policies and procedures. Apprentices must identify one type of abuse and then describe: · how they would work in partnership with external agencies to respond to concerns about this type of abuse · how they would support colleagues to identify this type of abuse and to respond to it in line with their organisational policies and procedures. They must also identify one area of unsafe practice and describe: · the signs they would use to identify unsafe practice in this area · how they would work within their organisational policies and procedures to report, respond and record this unsafe practice Apprentices must explain the principles and practices (including regulations and organisational policies and procedures) that they would apply to address conflicts or dilemmas between an individual’s rights and duty of care. Examples of conflicts or dilemmas could include sudden and unexpected changes in individual’s care preferences, a significant change in the level of involvement of family or carers in planning care, or balancing human rights with potential risks and hazards to an individual’s physical health or safety. They must also describe the ways in which they would lead and support others in applying these principles and practices. Supporting others could include supervision, one-to-one meetings, mentoring meetings, care team meetings, or risk assessments. Apprentices must present suitable work-based evidence to show how they have responded to the changing health or wellbeing needs of an individual and how they monitored and reported on these changes. The evidence must show the physical, cognitive or emotional changes an individual has experienced, the ways in which the apprentice responded to these changes (e.g. health intervention monitoring, risks assessments, referring to external agencies, etc.) and the actions they took within their organisational procedures to monitor and report on these changes. Apprentices must explain how they led and supported others to promote the wellbeing of individuals. Work-based evidence should include expert witness testimony and a reflective account supported by relevant work products such as risk assessment records and/or physical intervention records, including food and fluid charts (Reference to page 87- EPA specification) Answer to situation judgement test A: option B Answer to situation judgement test B: option B

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